In a rare move, the U.S. has indicted two Russian government agents for their suspected involvement in a massive Yahoo data breach. But what now?

Security experts say Wednesday's indictment might amount to nothing more than naming and shaming Russia. That's because no one expects the Kremlin to play along with the U.S. indictment.

It'll take more than just naming and shaming to dissuade the Kremlin from sponsoring future cyberattacks, experts said.

"More needs to be done," said Edward McAndrew, a former U.S. federal cybercrime prosecutor who now works at law firm Ballard Spahr. "We have to move beyond the indictment stage."

The next stage might go beyond the legal realm and into geopolitical steps like sanctions or even cyberwarfare, he said.

Of course, two can play at that game. It's possible that Russia might indict U.S. agents it suspects in a hacking case -- not that it would have any more luck prosecuting them.

"I won't be surprised if that happens," McAndrew said. "I imagine that our government, and most governments, will not be handing over their intelligence operatives."

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